Month: November 2018




New JRA Executive Director Excited for Future

November 26, 2018

“It was very soon after I started, but it was really exciting,” Roth-Saks says. “I had such a wonderful and warm welcoming from our community and our volunteers and the board. It was so terrific to be able to start this leadership position with that type of excitement and energy.”



Image of student looking frustrated at a classroom blackboard (ThinkStock photo)

An ‘A’ Student Gives Teachers 8 Pieces of Advice

November 16, 2018

Taylor Hudak, 22, of Guilford, Conn., is a master’s student in the Integrated Bachelor’s/Master’s Program at University of Connecticut’s Neag School of Education. She graduated with bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and secondary mathematics education from UConn in May. She wrote this commentary, which was published in the Hartford Courant.




Just Passing Tests Won’t Make Teachers Good

November 14, 2018

“My experience in my teacher prep program included four clinic experiences, in urban and suburban placements, over 10 lesson observations completed and evaluated by teachers, principals and instructional coaches and more than 90 credits of education-focused courses,” says Olivia Singer. “From my perspective, these hands-on learning experiences with students, educators and renowned faculty at the University of Connecticut were of much more value to me than any multiple choice test I could have taken.”


Opinion: Why I Retired Right Here in Connecticut

November 13, 2018

“Although I retired in 2014 as a teacher and coach in Connecticut public schools, I continued to work pretty much full time until 2016, but in those two years I reflected often on where I’d retire and what that retirement would look like,” says Peter Leeds.


Letters About Literature Book Image

Letters About Literature Contest: Entries Due Jan. 11

November 12, 2018

Each year, the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress holds a reading and writing contest known as Letters About Literature for students in grades 4-12. Students are asked to read a book, poem, or speech and write a letter to that author (living or dead) about how the text affected them personally. Letters are judged on the state and national levels. Tens of thousands of students from across the country enter Letters About Literature each year.