Category: Community Engagement


Read stories related to faculty, students, and alumni involved in public engagement initiatives.

Holocaust Education Evolves as Number of Survivors Declines

February 10, 2022

“When someone feels like their rights are being violated or the government is overstepping their bounds, they’ll cite the Holocaust, which is very dangerous,” says Alan Marcus, a professor in UConn’s Neag School of Education.

Marcus recently was part of a team that produced a research study that was published in “Holocaust Studies” that examined the transition of Holocaust education from live to virtual survivor testimony. Marcus also wrote a column for The Conversation on the issue.


Yasmin Elgoharry, Alumni Board Scholarship winner.

Neag School Names Recipients of 2022 Alumni Board Scholarship

January 24, 2022

Congratulations to the recipients of the Neag School of Education Alumni Board Scholarship for 2022: Sandeep Dutta, a doctoral student in learning, leadership, and education policy (LLEP) with a concentration in sports management; Yasmin Elgoharry, a doctoral student in LLEP with a concentration in higher education racial justice and decolonization; and Joselyn Perez, a doctoral student studying research methods, measurement, and evaluation. The Alumni Board Scholarship provides a $1,000 award annually to students enrolled in a Neag School master’s, doctorate, or sixth-year program who have proven academic excellence or demonstrated financial need.


Three masked students wave from the Gentry Building.

Call for Public Comments

January 21, 2022

The Neag School of Education at The University of Connecticut is hosting an accreditation visit by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) on May 1, 2022. Interested parties are invited to submit third-party comments to the evaluation team. Comments must be received no later than 6 weeks prior (March 20, 2022) to the CAEP site visit date.


Faculty and staff look at a presentation poster.

Neag School Accolades: January 2022

January 21, 2022

Congratulations to our Neag School alumni, faculty, staff, and students on their continued accomplishments inside and outside the classroom. If you have an accolade to share, we want to hear from you! Please send any news items and story ideas to neag-communications@uconn.edu. In addition to the Dean’s Office and Department achievements, explore this edition’s Accolades from the following: Faculty/Staff; Alumni; Students; as well as In Memoriam.


Group of students in classroom, female student raises hand.

Academically Talented Students With Autism Can Prepare for Success in College

January 13, 2022

Students who are both academically talented and also on the autism spectrum can enjoy greater success in college based on the correct high school experience. That’s the finding of research performed by a UConn team in the Neag School of Education and published in a recent issue of the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. The study used the largest sample of academically advanced students, who also have autism, in any research study ever conducted. The authors were interested in researching a group where the focus is typically on disabilities, not talent and abilities.


Female teacher wearing mask helps young student.

How to Use Homework to Support Student Success

January 13, 2022

“School assignments that a student is expected to do outside of the regular school day—that’s homework,” says Sandra Chafouleas, a UConn Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor at the Neag School of Education. “The general guideline is 10 minutes of nightly homework per grade level beginning after kindergarten. This amounts to just a few minutes for younger elementary students to up to 2 hours for high school students.”



Color coded map of COVID numbers in Connecticut.

Teaching Map Literacy Is Important for Having an Informed Public

December 17, 2021

People tend to look at maps as information that should be taken as fact without the need for analysis, but that’s a mistake. When the average person consumes information through sources like television, radio, a website, or a newspaper, they might do it with a critical eye. What is the viewpoint of the news outlet? Has it been trustworthy in the past? Is there another source for this information to get a second opinion? A map is different. People tend to look at maps as absolute information that should be taken as fact without analysis. But that’s a mistake, according to a pair of UConn professors from the Neag School of Education in a recent article published in Social Studies Research and Practice.


Teaching Map Literacy Is Important Part of Having an Informed Public

December 17, 2021

When the average person consumes information through sources like television, radio, a website, or a newspaper, they might do it with a critical eye. What is the viewpoint of the news outlet? Has it been trustworthy in the past? Is there another source for this information to get a second opinion? A map is different. People tend to look at maps as absolute information that should be taken as fact without analysis. But that’s a mistake, according to a pair of UConn professors from the Neag School of Education in a recent article published in Social Studies Research and Practice.


Using Phenomena to Help Students Explain the World

December 15, 2021

What are phenomena and how can science teachers use these events to engage students in science? Professor of Science Education Todd Campbell joins us to help start a series about using phenemona in science education. Listen to hear about new strategies in how pre-service science educators are being prepared, where to start if you are beginning a journey to adopt NGSS, and how we can all use phenomena to help students explain the world around them.